Shake Up Call

Last night’s magnitude 6.9 earthquake off of the coast of Eureka, California was reminder that we live in earthquake country.  Thankfully, there were no reports of injuries or damage and the ocean tremor did not generate a tsunami. [youtube=http://youtu.be/CVNjK-S9dVQ]

Judy was in Tokyo, riding the train to the airport, when the 8.9 Tōhoku earthquake struck. Her immediate reaction was simple: to reach out to her digital networks, and let them know what was happening. Tomorrow, March 11 is the 3rd Anniversary of the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.

Earthquakes can happen at any time with little or no warning.  That’s why it’s important to take simple steps now so we’re ready for any emergency.

Get Connected: When disaster strikes, we come together to help each other. Getting prepared is about knowing your neighbors, saying hi to the regulars at the local market, and staying in touch with family and friends—both digitally and in person.

Gather Supplies: Whether you’re just starting out or a preparedness pro, gathering your emergency supplies is easy. A good rule of thumb is to have supplies for about 3 days, or 72 hours. You’ll be surprised at how much you already have.

Make a Plan with your People: A little foresight can go a long way—make a plan now, so you know how to find and get in touch with your people when something happens. The same connections that are important in everyday life—with friends, family, neighbors, and communities—are even more crucial in a crisis.

For more information visit www.sf72.org.  SF72 is your hub for emergency preparedness. You’ll find information about what to do in an emergency, simple steps to get connected, and useful guides to help you get prepared.

A Quick Look at Golden Guardian in San Francisco

How we prepare now, before a disaster, dictates how we react, respond and recover during the real thing.  A mock 7.8 earthquake in San Francisco seems like a good test! We'll go into more detail later about what went on when DEM and our partners were put to the test.  For now check out our photo gallery and our coverage in the San Francisco Chronicle and Emergency Management Magazine!

Photos by Maurice Ramirez - www.mauriceramirez.com

Step Up (Literally!), San Francisco

Take steps towards community preparedness and join us for our first ever SF Tsunami Walk Saturday, March 30th at 10:00 am. Bring your family, invite your friends and meet your neighbors and find out what to do in case of a tsunami, which is to walk UP to higher ground.

highground

Meet us at the intersection of The Great Highway and Lincoln Way.  As we would during an actual tsunami evacuation, we'll walk inland and away from the beach. The short walk ends at Francis Scott Key Elementary School which is the neighborhood’s Tsunami Evacuation Assembly Area. So, sign up here or just show up at 10:00 AM!

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Meanwhile, next week kicks off Tsunami Preparedness Awareness Week (March 24-30, 2013).  Tsunamis are a very real risk to San Francisco; in fact, we have many tsunami inundation zones along the city's coastlines.  And two years ago we had a tsunami warning in San Francisco, which was caused by the Tohoku, Japan earthquake.

Throughout Tsunami Preparedness Week we’ll post preparedness tips on our blog and @EM4SF on Twitter.  And remember, you’re more prepared than you think!

To learn more about emergency preparedness in general, visit our preparedness web site 72hours.org.

The Fall Season of Emergency Preparedness Is Upon Us!

"ShakeOut is a great way to practice mental and muscle memory so you know what to do the next time the earth shakes" Kate Long, California Emergency Management Agency Earthquake and Tsunami Program Deputy

With September being National Preparedness Month and October being the 24th anniversary of the Loma Prieta Earthquake, this fall the San Francisco Department of Emergency Management encourages you to take these reminders as incentives to build upon your preparedness and resilience. Whether by visiting www.72hours.org to develop your emergency plan; downloading SF Heroes (www.sfheroes.com) to your smart phone to test your preparedness know-how; registering for www.AlertSF.org, DEM’s text-based message system that delivers emergency information to cell phones and other text-enabled devices, as well as email accounts—there are many simple and often immediate ways to enhance your preparedness and resilience. DEM also highly encourage you to become a trained member of your local San Francisco Neighborhood Emergency Response Team (www.sfgov.org/sffdnert). 

 

The good news is that you are more prepared than you think. Being prepared isn’t necessarily about buying an expensive earthquake or emergency kit. It’s about having basic items gathered and ready at hand. It’s about talking with your family about where to meet after a disaster or making sure everyone knows where your emergency supplies are. It’s about knowing to drop, cover and hold on during an earthquake.

 

While on the topic of knowing what to do during an earthquake, this October marks the 5th Annual Great California ShakeOut, California’s state-wide drop, cover and hold on drill. We hope you will participate and help to spread the word about registering and participating in the drill planned for Thursday, October 18th at 10:18am. The purpose of the ShakeOut drill is practice and preparation: knowing what to do before, during and after an earthquake and preparing our homes, workplaces and schools for any type of an emergency.

How to Participate?

Register yourself, your household and your workplace for the drill at www.shakeout.org and join the rest of California on October 18th by practicing drop, cover and hold on at 10:18 am. Additional ways to participate include posting ShakeOut posters in your organizations public areas and/or handing out post cards to promote awareness of, and participation in the drill. Finally, tweet about your ShakeOut experience (#shakeout)!

San Francisco is a great place to live, work and play and it’s important we all do what we can to be prepared for any kind of emergency, small or large.  

 

 

 

 

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